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Quiz:  Sensation and Perception


 

This information gathered for this quiz comes from Psychology 101, Chapter 5: Sensation and Perception

 


Directions:  Respond to the following items with either true or false.  When you have responded to all items, click the Score button at the bottom of the page.


1.

Absolute threshold refers to the point that the change in a stimulus can be detected.
    True
    False

2.

The amount of change required to notice the change in a stimulus is called the just noticeable difference.
    True
    False

3.

Weber's Law states that the change in a stimulus must be stated in a percentage rather than an absolute.
    True
    False

4.

Sensory adaptation helps us push unchanging sensory material to the background therefore freeing up our senses for stimuli that is changing.
    True
    False

5. 

Gestalt means form or whole and refers to the idea that the whole is often greater than the sum of its parts.
    True
    False

6.

The four principles of grouping include closure, similarity, proximity, and continuity.
    True
    False

7.

We believe things are smaller when they are farther away and have to reinterpret the object's size repeatedly as we approach it.
    True
    False

8.

Understanding that a round dinner plate may look oval from a different angle refers to shape constancy.
    True
    False

9.

We use monocular cues to determine closeness and binocular cues to determine farness.
    True
    False

10.

Retinal disparity refers to the manner in which a person's eyes each send an image to the brain and how these images are interpreted.
    True
    False


 

 

 

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  visitors since September 23, 2002